swarm

Here, swarmy swarmy

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Another, super calm swarm showed up at Tyler and Laura’s (the site of the original swarmous). We still can’t figure out if either swarm came from their top bar hive, or if bees are just really attracted to their insanely beautiful home/urban farm. I’m guessing the latter. 

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This swarm was a bit tricky to capture… not as easy as shaking a tree branch into a box. I decided to scoop the bees up with my gloved hands (they felt like a heavy, vibrating blanket) and placed them into a cooler for quick transport to South Circle Farm. The bees probably thought they’d done died and gone to heaven. 

Sooooo, If you live in Indy and you see/hear of a swarm, give me a shout out. I’ll make sure they find a nice home. 

 

To Catch a Swarm (Part 2)

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This swarm was gigantic. A swarm of bees (especially one this size) might look intimidating, but bees in this state are actually super calm. For one, their little bellies are full of honey in preparation for house hunting and they have no hive or brood to protect.

Laura rushed me home to grab a spare hive while Tyler found a ladder and a limb cutter tool thingy. Within twenty minutes we’d set up a sunny spot for their new home, positioned the ladder below the bees and with a tug, snip, and plop, the enormous swarm (the swarmous) was resting in a plastic tub. 

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Now, this next part gets real technical. I took the branch full of bees, shook it into the open hive, and closed the lid. When you’re transferring a swarm, it’s important to get the queen into the new hive. She’s somewhere right in the middle of that mass, so use your best judgment. 

I think the bees will be quite pleased with their new pad, which just happens to be on a small urban farm in Cottage Home. Bees, you lucky dogs. 

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Looking for Part 1? Here it is.